Ascitic fluid analysis 9 steps and results interpretation new health advisor causes of blood cancer in hindi

Ascites is a condition that is characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the abdominal region. Often, it occurs due to improper functioning of liver that leads to abnormal accumulation of fluid in the space present between the lining of the organs and the abdomen. However, people who are diagnosed with ascites are reported to only have a ranging rate of 30-40%survival after 5 years of initial diagnosis. If you think you are experiencing the symptoms associated with ascites then seek medical help right away. With an ascetic fluid analysis—as the key diagnostic for ascites, your doctor can better monitor your condition and offer the most effective treatment. What Can Ascitic Fluid Analysis Include?

Ascitic fluid analysis or peritoneal fluid analysis is the major diagnostic test to study the pathophysiology of accumulation of fluid in the peritoneum, including diagnosing the causes and inflammation of the fluids.


As for the fluid, the inflammatory collection is exudate, and the non-inflammatory collection is transudate. Some patients may wonder what tests are included. Read on to find out what to expect in the analysis. 1. Gross Appearance

The proteins present in exudate are more than 3g/dl but less than 3g/dl in transudate. In order to differentiate transudate from exudate, serum protein and ascitic fluid protein ratio is of great importance. The ratio’s value must be greater than 0.5 for the diagnosis of exudate. 4. Cell Count

There are fewer than 250/µL polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and fewer than 500/µL leukocytes in normal ascitic fluid. But, in an inflammatory condition, the white blood cell count will arise. If the PMN count increases to 250/µL or more, there are high chances of the presence peritonitis. For the tuberculosis and peritoneal carcinomatosis cases, lymphocytes are predominant.

This test is better done on cytospin. It helps in differentiating as well as finding the malignant cells. At times it’s difficult to differentiate between the malignant and mesothelial cells.The morphology of mesothelial cells differs with respect to cellular content and nuclei. There may be clumping of chromatin and altered ratio of nucleus and cytoplasm. Prominent nucleoli may be present. 6. Glucose

As for detecting the bacteria of the ascitic fluid, culture test has a ratio of sensitivity at 92% with samples being inoculated into blood culture bottles timely. While, gram staining procedure just has a ratio at 10% in detecting spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. When Should You Take an Ascitic Fluid Analysis?

• Budd Chiari syndrome (obstruction of hepatic vein) in conjunction with tumors like pancreatic cancer, hypernephroma and hepatoma, or in conjunction with hematological disorders like myeloid metaplasia, polycythemia vera and myeloproliferative disease or as a result of infections.

• Test to assess the physical appearance: Normal color of peritoneal fluid is straw colored.If cloudy colored—presence of white blood cells or microorganisms; if reddish colored—presence of blood; if yellow colored—liver disease and may become milky due to lymphatic system obstruction; if greenish colored—presence of bile.

Ascites is a condition that is characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the abdominal region. Often, it occurs due to improper functioning of liver that leads to abnormal accumulation of fluid in the space present between the lining of the organs and the abdomen. However, people who are diagnosed with ascites are reported to only have a ranging rate of 30-40%survival after 5 years of initial diagnosis. If you think you are experiencing the symptoms associated with ascites then seek medical help right away. With an ascetic fluid analysis—as the key diagnostic for ascites, your doctor can better monitor your condition and offer the most effective treatment. What Can Ascitic Fluid Analysis Include?

Ascitic fluid analysis or peritoneal fluid analysis is the major diagnostic test to study the pathophysiology of accumulation of fluid in the peritoneum, including diagnosing the causes and inflammation of the fluids. As for the fluid, the inflammatory collection is exudate, and the non-inflammatory collection is transudate. Some patients may wonder what tests are included. Read on to find out what to expect in the analysis. 1. Gross Appearance

The proteins present in exudate are more than 3g/dl but less than 3g/dl in transudate. In order to differentiate transudate from exudate, serum protein and ascitic fluid protein ratio is of great importance. The ratio’s value must be greater than 0.5 for the diagnosis of exudate. 4. Cell Count

There are fewer than 250/µL polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and fewer than 500/µL leukocytes in normal ascitic fluid. But, in an inflammatory condition, the white blood cell count will arise. If the PMN count increases to 250/µL or more, there are high chances of the presence peritonitis. For the tuberculosis and peritoneal carcinomatosis cases, lymphocytes are predominant.

This test is better done on cytospin. It helps in differentiating as well as finding the malignant cells. At times it’s difficult to differentiate between the malignant and mesothelial cells.The morphology of mesothelial cells differs with respect to cellular content and nuclei. There may be clumping of chromatin and altered ratio of nucleus and cytoplasm. Prominent nucleoli may be present. 6. Glucose

As for detecting the bacteria of the ascitic fluid, culture test has a ratio of sensitivity at 92% with samples being inoculated into blood culture bottles timely. While, gram staining procedure just has a ratio at 10% in detecting spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. When Should You Take an Ascitic Fluid Analysis?

• Budd Chiari syndrome (obstruction of hepatic vein) in conjunction with tumors like pancreatic cancer, hypernephroma and hepatoma, or in conjunction with hematological disorders like myeloid metaplasia, polycythemia vera and myeloproliferative disease or as a result of infections.

• Test to assess the physical appearance: Normal color of peritoneal fluid is straw colored.If cloudy colored—presence of white blood cells or microorganisms; if reddish colored—presence of blood; if yellow colored—liver disease and may become milky due to lymphatic system obstruction; if greenish colored—presence of bile.