Author junot diaz accused of sexual misconduct, abuse by multiple women on twitter trichomoniasis parasite

Junot Díaz is yet another sick male artist who mistreated women. Add him to the long list of cultural icons like Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen, etc. and you begin to see how a social dynamic of violent misogyny is not only perpetuated, but celebrated. #TimesUp #MeToo

Zinzi Clemmons, author of What We Lose , accused Diaz of cornering and forcibly kissing her after she invited him speak at a workshop on issues of representation in literature. In her tweet, which she posted on Friday, she said she’s “far from the only one” he’s treated that way.

As a grad student, I invited Junot Diaz to speak to a workshop on issues of representation in literature. I was an unknown wide-eyed 26 yo, and he used it as an opportunity to corner and forcibly kiss me. I’m far from the only one he’s done this 2, I refuse to be silent anymore.


I’ve basically avoided literary functions and posted no photos of myself online in order to avoid people like Diaz and Stein (who I have my own set of terrible stories about as well). I’m sick of these talentless assholes dictating my life. No more.

Diaz, who penned The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and This Is How You Lose Her, has been widely regarded for his compelling storytelling about the Dominican-American experience. In 2008, he received a Pulitzer Prize for his writing and in 2012 he received a MacArthur Fellowship, also known as a “Genius Grant.”

Prob 7 or 8 years ago I attended a talk by Junot Diaz followed by a QA. A white woman, early twenties, asked a question related to an autobiography she was writing. He looked at her, a woman he had never met or spoken to, and responded, you don’t have a story to tell.

I was 32 and my first novel hadn’t come out yet. I was invited to a dinner and sat next to him. I disagreed with him on a minor point. He shouted the word “rape” in my face to prove his. It was completely bizarre, disproportionate, and violent. https://t.co/WQr0hLW8Z5

The dinner just got worse from there. I’ve never experienced such virulent misogyny. Every point I made—ABOUT issues women face in publishing—he made a point of talking over me, cutting me off, ignoring me to talk to the other (male) scifi writer at the table, who played along.

“During his tour for THIS IS HOW YOU LOSE HER, Junot Díaz did a QA at the grad program I’d just graduated from,” Machado tweeted. “When I made the mistake of asking him a question about his protagonist’s unhealthy, pathological relationship with women, he went off for me for twenty minutes.”

“So, Junot Díaz can talk all he wants about writing books that interrogate masculinity, but that’s all it is: talk,” she tweeted. “His books are misogynist trash and folks either don’t see it (which disturbs me) or won’t acknowledge it (which disturbs me for different reasons).”

During his tour for THIS IS HOW YOU LOSE HER, Junot Díaz did a QA at the grad program I’d just graduated from. When I made the mistake of asking him a question about his protagonist’s unhealthy, pathological relationship with women, he went off for me for twenty minutes. https://t.co/7wuQOarBIJ

When I suggested that maybe my question had been answered, and he move on to someone else’s question, he refused. He told me he was leaning on me to explain myself, which is what he did with his students. (Never mind that I wasn’t his student, or a student at all.)

And this happened in a room full of people! There’s a recording! He was not embarrassed about his behavior at all. A friend of mine was so stressed out from the whole interaction that she texted me saying she’d have to leave so she could go home and take a Xanax.

And I’ll never forget: his male handlers (presumably from the university? I don’t know) were sitting directly in front of me, and every time he spoke they nodded enthusiastically and in unison, and every time I spoke, they froze. When I think about those men I want to scream.

That night, I went to his reading at a local venue. When he got up after his introduction, he said, Today, someone complained that there was too much cheating in this book. This is for them. Then he read the stories/passages I’d cited hours earlier.

I’d obviously struck a nerve, though I didn’t understand precisely how. Because even if his book contained autobiographical material, I knew that reacting to a reader’s criticism this way—confusing yourself for the character—was amateur hour. I knew it even then.

So, Junot Díaz can talk all he wants about writing books that interrogate masculinity, but that’s all it is: talk. His books are misogynist trash and folks either don’t see it (which disturbs me) or won’t acknowledge it (which disturbs me for different reasons).

And it sucks for a very particular reason: people of color are so underrepresented in publishing, we have deep attachments to those who succeed. People are defensive about JD because there are so few high-profile Latinx authors. I get it. That doesn’t change the facts.

Others cited an essay Diaz published in the New Yorker in April, in which he discussed abuse he experienced as a child and how it influenced relationships he had with women as an adult. Many viewed his piece as an attempt to preemptively excuse future reports of misogyny and abuse.

I hadn’t been keeping up w/ Junot Díaz recently. But to hear that he’d written some article for the New Yorker in April, confessing that he hurt women finding out that it was probably a preemptive cover for the misogyny assault he’s committed against them is reprehensible.

Didn’t name Junot Diaz when I first put out this tweet but had him in mind, and now I see my Twitter timeline full of the women speaking out, and we can clearly see how his New Yorker piece is both distraction and a preemptive attempt to smother criticism. https://t.co/J4qTYVmnVk

“I think about you, X⁠—. I think about that woman from the Brattle,” he wrote. “I think about silence; I think about shame, I think about loneliness. I think about the hurt I caused. I think of all the years and all the life I lost to the hiding and to the fear and to the pain.”