Biking and back problem – bike forums total hip replacement surgery video

Well, today I’m suffering another bout of a very sore lower back — the kind where it’s getting up from a sitting position that is really painful. This has happened occasionally for a long time, but recently it’s been getting much more frequent. I’ve never been able to pin it to anything that I’ve done, except a couple times when it happened after I had been lifting or carrying something heavy, which I make a point never to do any more.

Anyway, it started yesterday a few hours after a morning run. I’ve thought that running might cause it, but last week I went out for two good runs and my back was fine afterward. Just hard to figure out, but I’m thinking of winding my running down even more than I have just in case…

Anyway, I can probably do without running as long as I’m able to keep cycling, but am not sure about any relationship to back problems.


I did get a sore back on the 4th or 5th day of a tour a few years ago, but that was only after doing a lot of tough climbs, and biking has not seemed to bother me otherwise. Anyone have any experience in this area? Given where I ride, biking won’t give me quite the workout that running always has, but at 71 I’d still like to stay active for as long as possible!

I learned in June 2015 that I have lumber spinal stenosis. Running is not good if you have SS. My spine doc (who is also an avid cyclist) said that riding a GOOD road bike (leaning over the drop bars) is one of the best exercises for my back. He told me the Litespeed was an excellent bike for my back but the $2500 CF bike I had at the time was not good. He said it was low quality carbon. So I got the super expensive Cannondale bike I’ve had since Oct 2015.

Have you visited a spine doc for a check up or consultation?Thanks for the post. I have an appointment with my GP later this week and will go from there. He’s conservative as far as medical intervention is concerned (minimal meds, etc.) and has always tried to keep me so I’m able to exercise as much as possible. He tells me I’m one of his most boring patients since there’s never any changes he can recommend I make for exercise diet (as opposed to the typical patient that he has to tell lose weight, exercise more year after year).

I am fifty-seven years old. If I had kept up with/ worked on strengthening my back/ hips when I was younger, it would have taken less time and I would be ahead of the game. Since I am older (and testosterone levels lower) it is more difficult/ takes longer to build muscle. I think if I had worked on strengthening my back/hips 20 years ago. A) It would have been easier and B) Would have taken maybe six months. (currently 1.5 years in progress.) I do not see the end of these exercises in sight. Even though I have gotten back my fully aggressive position on my bike (my handlebars are seven inches over the front tire), they had been 9.5 there is no way that I could ride with them that low a few years ago, I still have some weak spots in my back/ hips. I hope that this answers your question/ clarifies my point. Just so, there’s no end to it. As one ages, it only gets harder, at first to improve, then to hold even, then to slow the decline. The alternative is worse, just keep that in mind, OP.

I am fifty-seven years old. If I had kept up with/ worked on strengthening my back/ hips when I was younger, it would have taken less time and I would be ahead of the game. Since I am older (and testosterone levels lower) it is more difficult/ takes longer to build muscle. I think if I had worked on strengthening my back/hips 20 years ago. A) It would have been easier and B) Would have taken maybe six months. (currently 1.5 years in progress.) I do not see the end of these exercises in sight. Even though I have gotten back my fully aggressive position on my bike (my handlebars are seven inches over the front tire), they had been 9.5 there is no way that I could ride with them that low a few years ago, I still have some weak spots in my back/ hips. I hope that this answers your question/ clarifies my point.Oh I understood all along; I’m 59. I was simply reinforcing your solution that exercise is the key to good skeletal/muscular health. Using age is typically more of an excuse, than it is a true limitation.

I have all that old-person back crap: lumbar stenosis, arthritic facets, thin discs, fractured vertebra, but no blown disc. The only thing that keeps me operational is hard workouts at the gym. Lots of back work, squats, stiff-legged deadlifts, back machine, plus the usual other full-body stuff. Plus lots of cycling on my stretched-out road bike with bars below saddle.

What works is strengthening your back so that it stays in column. And that takes a lot of work. Shying away from working your back, avoiding back pain, shirking lifting, all that only exacerbates the problem. Yes, it’ll get sore. Make it hurt, rest it, make it hurt, repeat endlessly.That makes a lot of sense. I’ve generally tried to keep doing things like you mention, but find that it’s a thin line between doing it until it’s just sore and triggering a major episode like I’ve been going through the last couple of days. I’m going to ask the doc for some p.t. focused on my back and some guidance in how to go about building up and maintaining my conditioning.

I’m not a doctor…but have had back issues for ~25yrs (now 61). This is my experience. Spent 29yrs in the military where running is a requirement…pushed through, but 8 specialists in the last 7 years said stop running…, the last one …or else… (he one who works with the SpecOps guys largely on jump type injuries)—so I modified my workouts and started walking with the walkers—rode bike for PT tests. Lots of core training during and since, plus weights. Started seriously trying to ride my real bike a little over a year ago, and while I can push it to the old back pain, it is rare and can almost always be attributed to a minor fit/adjustment issue, or something else I was doing. Here’s something interesting and leads to my conclusion—I had a riding lawn tractor that beat my back up so bad, I’d be in pain for two days…I use a walk behind now with zero issues. Keep a chart of what you are doing and when your back flares up…I’d be suspicious of the running, but less so of the bike and you may find some other cause/contributor all together.