Can sorbitol cause insulin resistance diabetes type 1 life expectancy

Jon Kaplan jon~the-kaplans.com wrote in message news:3FD77A06.CF02B424~the-kaplans.com… Jenny wrote: Fructose plays games with your meter but it is not at all good for you. It goes straight to the liver and turns into fats rather than into your blood stream as glucose, so if you just look at the meter, it looks like it’s good for you. But it pushes up the triglycerides and turns into more fat which increases your read more… class=boldinsulin resistance. That’s fascinating!! I’ve never heard that before. Does that mean fruits should be avoided as being largely fructose? I too thought fruits were largely fructose, but Quentin Grady corrected me, telling me that they were a combination of things including sorbitol. I have been to three dieticians. The first one was a fruit pusher.


The other two said it was a good thing that I didn’t like fruit because it was bad for diabetics. They both said it was frequently included in the meal plans for diabetics because they liked it so much, believed it to be healthy, and hated to give it up. I very rarely eat fruit. And when I do, it is just a bite or two. And what about honey? I know some health food nuts who push honey as a much more natural sugar. I believe it’s mostly fructose. Not sure what is in honey but it’s no better for you than table sugar. — Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/

Jon Kaplan wrote in message news:*****************@***************… Jenny wrote: Fructose plays games with your meter but it is not at all good for you. It goes straight to the liver and turns into fats rather than into your blood stream as glucose, so if you just look at the meter, it looks like it’s good for you. But it pushes up the triglycerides and turns into more fat which increases your insulin resistance. read more… That’s fascinating!! I’ve never heard that before. Does that mean fruits should be avoided as being largely fructose? I too thought fruits were largely fructose, but Quentin Grady corrected me, telling me that they were a combination of things including sorbitol. I have been to three dieticians. The first one was a fruit pusher. The other two said it was a good thing that I didn’t like fruit because it was bad for diabetics. They both said it was frequently included in the meal plans for diabetics because they liked it so much, believed it to be healthy, and hated to give it up. I very rarely eat fruit. And when I do, it is just a bite or two. And what about honey? I know some health food nuts who push honey as a much more natural sugar. I believe it’s mostly fructose. Not sure what is in honey but it’s no better for you than table sugar. — Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/

Sorbitol? I was studying insulin resistance on the internet and read a piece by some doctor? and it said that the sugar in your blood attaches to body cells and turns into the poison .. Sorbitol, and it stays there til the cell dies. I guess we all knew that the HBA1C was testing for this sugar level, but did we know it was Sorbitol? I was looking at my pack of Xtra sugar free gum and Sorbitol is the very first ingredient. It is put in all kinds of products as a moistenining read more… agent and even sold outright as a sugar substitute. It was explained that sorbitol is hydrogenated glucose. This reminds me of the cholesterol situation, namely that ingested cholesterol has less effect on blood cholesterol than saturated fats do. So I am wondering if ingested sorbitol goes straight into your blood as sorbitol or it is perhaps changed to glucose then later changed back to sorbitol by the liver. Either way it sounds like something to avoid even if it is a sugar alcohol. If it is like Xylitol for example, which is considered safe by most researchers, it is not absorbed in the gut, but digested by bacteria there, sort of like bean sugars are, and end up making gas etc. Ok, you scientists out there, can anyone answer this one. Is Sorbitol safe to eat?? Jim L.

Sorbitol I was studying insulin resistance on the internet and read a piece by some doctor? and it said that the sugar in your blood attaches to body cells and turns into the poison .. Sorbitol, and it stays there til the cell dies. I guess we all knew that the HBA1C was testing for this sugar level, but did we know it was Sorbitol? I was looking at my pack of Xtra sugar free gum and Sorbitol is the very first ingredient. It read more… is put in all kinds of products as a moistenining agent and even sold outright as a sugar substitute. It was explained that sorbitol is hydrogenated glucose. This reminds me of the cholesterol situation, namely that ingested cholesterol has less effect on blood cholesterol than saturated fats do. So I am wondering if ingested sorbitol goes straight into your blood as sorbitol or it is perhaps changed to glucose then later changed back to sorbitol by the liver. Either way it sounds like something to avoid even if it is a sugar alcohol. If it is like Xylitol for example, which is considered safe by most researchers, it is not absorbed in the gut, but digested by bacteria there, sort of like bean sugars are, and end up making gas etc. Ok, you scientists out there, can anyone answer this one. Is Sorbitol safe to eat?? Jim L.

Jim L 2oldpennies~copper.net wrote in message news:3f30ad3b$1_4~newsfeed… I was studying insulin resistance on the internet and read a piece by some doctor? and it said that the sugar in your blood attaches to body cells and turns into the poison .. Sorbitol, and it stays there til the cell dies. I guess we all knew that the HBA1C was testing for this sugar level, but did we know it was Sorbitol? I was looking at my pack of read more… Xtra sugar free gum and Sorbitol is the very first ingredient. It is put in all kinds of products as a moistenining agent and even sold outright as a sugar substitute. It was explained that sorbitol is hydrogenated glucose. This reminds me of the cholesterol situation, namely that ingested cholesterol has less effect on blood cholesterol than saturated fats do. So I am wondering if ingested sorbitol goes straight into your blood as sorbitol or it is perhaps changed to glucose then later changed back to sorbitol by the liver. Either way it sounds like something to avoid even if it is a sugar alcohol. If it is like Xylitol for example, which is considered safe by most researchers, it is not absorbed in the gut, but digested by bacteria there, sort of like bean sugars are, and end up making gas etc. Ok, you scientists out there, can anyone answer this one. Is Sorbitol safe to eat?? Jim L. I have trouble with any of the sweeteners that end in ol . All cause me stomach distress. I can have a pack of gum and not have a problem. But anything more than that is a problem. — Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/