Erysipelas vs. cellulitis causes, symptoms, treatments new health advisor methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus treatment

Erysipelas and cellulitis are skin infections that develop as a result of bacterial entry through breaches in the skin, and even a medical professional finds it difficult to determine the differences of erysipelas vs. cellulitis. Erysipelas is a slight infection involving the skin and upper subcutaneous tissues, whereas cellulitis is a non-contagious infection of the skin. Causes of Erysipelas vs. Cellulitis 1. Erysipelas

Bacteria that penetrate the outer layer of your skin cause erysipelas. The most common bacteria are streptococci (strep) that normally live on your body’s skin surfaces without causing any harm. However, the bacteria can enter the lower tissues under your skin and hence cause an infection. The conditions that can cause a break in the skin may include eczema and athlete’s foot.


Additionally, erysipelas may be caused by anything that prevents fluid or blood drainage from a wound on your body. When erysipelas affects your face, it may have been spread there from the nasal passages following an infection in your throat and nose.

Cellulitis is caused when bacteria, most commonly strep and staphylococcus (staph), enter your skin through a break or crack. While cellulitis may occur anywhere on the body, and the location is more common in the lower leg. However, the bacteria are more likely to enter the damaged areas of the skin, such as a puncture wound, an ulcer, superficial cuts, recent surgery, athlete’s foot, and dry and flaky skin. Spider bites and other insect bites may also transmit the bacteria.

Unlike cellulitis, the lesion from erysipelas is raised, and there is a clear line at the edge of the erysipelas infected lesion. When erysipelas affects the face, the swollen area usually includes the nose and both cheeks. However, cellulitis is more likely to be associated with lymphangitis, an inflammation of one or more lymphatic vessels which usually occur on one side of the body.

General measures include rest, and elevation of any affected limbs higher than the rest of your body to reduce swelling. You’ll want to drink plenty of fluids, and it’s important that you move around from time to time. This may continue for several days before the swelling goes away.

Antibiotics are the most common treatment for erysipelas. You will take the medications for about a week. However, more serious cases are generally treated at the hospital, where antibiotics may be given intravenously. Older adults and young children might also require treatments in hospital. Other medication may be given to reduce pain and fever, or anti-fungal medication for those with athlete’s foot.

The treatment for cellulitis is much the same as it is with erysipelas. Antibiotics are used to treat the infection, and medication is prescribed for pain and inflammation. However, these treatments are usually extended over a longer period of time, depending on the severity of the condition, and it’s important to take all of the medication prescribed to ensure proper treatment. This longer treatment can also result if you suffer from a chronic disease or if your immune system isn’t working properly.

Contact your physician immediately if you aren’t responding to treatment within a few days after beginning a round of antibiotics, if your symptoms get progressively worse, or if you develop a fever. However, those with certain risk factors and pre-existing conditions might need a stay in the hospital for observation during treatment. Your physician may admit you for hospitalization if:

Erysipelas and cellulitis are skin infections that develop as a result of bacterial entry through breaches in the skin, and even a medical professional finds it difficult to determine the differences of erysipelas vs. cellulitis. Erysipelas is a slight infection involving the skin and upper subcutaneous tissues, whereas cellulitis is a non-contagious infection of the skin. Causes of Erysipelas vs. Cellulitis 1. Erysipelas

Bacteria that penetrate the outer layer of your skin cause erysipelas. The most common bacteria are streptococci (strep) that normally live on your body’s skin surfaces without causing any harm. However, the bacteria can enter the lower tissues under your skin and hence cause an infection. The conditions that can cause a break in the skin may include eczema and athlete’s foot. Additionally, erysipelas may be caused by anything that prevents fluid or blood drainage from a wound on your body. When erysipelas affects your face, it may have been spread there from the nasal passages following an infection in your throat and nose.

Cellulitis is caused when bacteria, most commonly strep and staphylococcus (staph), enter your skin through a break or crack. While cellulitis may occur anywhere on the body, and the location is more common in the lower leg. However, the bacteria are more likely to enter the damaged areas of the skin, such as a puncture wound, an ulcer, superficial cuts, recent surgery, athlete’s foot, and dry and flaky skin. Spider bites and other insect bites may also transmit the bacteria.

Unlike cellulitis, the lesion from erysipelas is raised, and there is a clear line at the edge of the erysipelas infected lesion. When erysipelas affects the face, the swollen area usually includes the nose and both cheeks. However, cellulitis is more likely to be associated with lymphangitis, an inflammation of one or more lymphatic vessels which usually occur on one side of the body.

General measures include rest, and elevation of any affected limbs higher than the rest of your body to reduce swelling. You’ll want to drink plenty of fluids, and it’s important that you move around from time to time. This may continue for several days before the swelling goes away.

Antibiotics are the most common treatment for erysipelas. You will take the medications for about a week. However, more serious cases are generally treated at the hospital, where antibiotics may be given intravenously. Older adults and young children might also require treatments in hospital. Other medication may be given to reduce pain and fever, or anti-fungal medication for those with athlete’s foot.

The treatment for cellulitis is much the same as it is with erysipelas. Antibiotics are used to treat the infection, and medication is prescribed for pain and inflammation. However, these treatments are usually extended over a longer period of time, depending on the severity of the condition, and it’s important to take all of the medication prescribed to ensure proper treatment. This longer treatment can also result if you suffer from a chronic disease or if your immune system isn’t working properly.

Contact your physician immediately if you aren’t responding to treatment within a few days after beginning a round of antibiotics, if your symptoms get progressively worse, or if you develop a fever. However, those with certain risk factors and pre-existing conditions might need a stay in the hospital for observation during treatment. Your physician may admit you for hospitalization if: