Holden beach turtle watch program – save the sea turtles loggerhead turtle, leatherback turtle

The Holden Beach Turtle Watch, or Turtle Patrol as it is usually referred to, was founded in 1989 to monitor and protect the sea turtle population on Holden Beach. This all volunteer, nonprofit conservation organization operates under the authority of the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. The program currently has approximately 65 members. Learn more..

Starting in May, volunteers begin a dawn patrol of the beach searching for turtle crawls and possible nests. Once a sea turtle crawl is found, a team of turtle patrol volunteers assembles at the crawl location to find the eggs. If the nest is in an unsafe location, the nest will be carefully moved to a safer area on the beach. The nest site is then covered with a protective grating and marked off with stakes, ribbon and a warning sign.


For the next 50-70 days of incubation the nest will be monitored for signs of an impending hatching. At that time, turtle patrol members will start a nightly watch on the nest until all of the hatchlings are released. The nest is then opened and an inventory is taken to account for any unhatched or non-fertile egg and insure that all live babies make it to the ocean. This process is repeated with each and every nest. The season ends in October when the last nest hatches.

Yes! There are still some of the 2018 HBTP T-shirts available. Sadly, due to some damage caused by Hurricane Florence, our only retail outlet for the annual shirts–Lighthouse Gifts– has not been open. Hopefully they will reopen soon. But in the meantime, we have a few options for you to …click to read more of this news article. After the storm

There is good news after the storm. Usually if we have a hurricane it brings an exciting and abrupt end of the turtle season. When the island was evacuated there were two unhatched nests left. Our Program Coordinator went out after the storm on Wednesday September 22 to check on …click to read more of this news article. Hurricane Florence

Right now there are just two unhatched nests on our beach. This morning’s rider said they were flat and quiet with lots of crab tracks. Earlier this week, nest 27 was completely inundated by the high tide. Team members were called to the beach when bubbles were seen coming from …click to read more of this news article.

The Holden Beach Turtle Watch, or Turtle Patrol as it is usually referred to, was founded in 1989 to monitor and protect the sea turtle population on Holden Beach. This all volunteer, nonprofit conservation organization operates under the authority of the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. The program currently has approximately 65 members. Learn more..

Starting in May, volunteers begin a dawn patrol of the beach searching for turtle crawls and possible nests. Once a sea turtle crawl is found, a team of turtle patrol volunteers assembles at the crawl location to find the eggs. If the nest is in an unsafe location, the nest will be carefully moved to a safer area on the beach. The nest site is then covered with a protective grating and marked off with stakes, ribbon and a warning sign. For the next 50-70 days of incubation the nest will be monitored for signs of an impending hatching. At that time, turtle patrol members will start a nightly watch on the nest until all of the hatchlings are released. The nest is then opened and an inventory is taken to account for any unhatched or non-fertile egg and insure that all live babies make it to the ocean. This process is repeated with each and every nest. The season ends in October when the last nest hatches.

Yes! There are still some of the 2018 HBTP T-shirts available. Sadly, due to some damage caused by Hurricane Florence, our only retail outlet for the annual shirts–Lighthouse Gifts– has not been open. Hopefully they will reopen soon. But in the meantime, we have a few options for you to …click to read more of this news article. After the storm

There is good news after the storm. Usually if we have a hurricane it brings an exciting and abrupt end of the turtle season. When the island was evacuated there were two unhatched nests left. Our Program Coordinator went out after the storm on Wednesday September 22 to check on …click to read more of this news article. Hurricane Florence

Right now there are just two unhatched nests on our beach. This morning’s rider said they were flat and quiet with lots of crab tracks. Earlier this week, nest 27 was completely inundated by the high tide. Team members were called to the beach when bubbles were seen coming from …click to read more of this news article.