How bronchitis is treated chest pain icd 10

A number of over-the-counter medications can help relieve some of the symptoms of both acute and chronic bronchitis. In general, these medications are more effective for short-term use if you have acute bronchitis. Most of the time, your doctor will recommend prescription-strength medication that has a more lasting effect for chronic bronchitis.

• Decongestants: Decongestants such as Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) and Afrin (oxymetazoline) loosen and help drain the mucus that may be in your sinuses, making it easier for you to breathe. There is some controversy about abuse of these medications, so it is important to be responsible and use them conservatively. Use decongestants only if they relieve your symptoms, and for no longer than a few days at a time.

• Fever reducers: Many of the medications that can reduce your fever also relieve mild pain, so these over-the-counter medications can do double duty.


Do not take them in doses higher than recommended, and be sure to tell your doctor or your child’s pediatrician about over-the-counter medications that you are using.

• Antibiotics: Most cases of acute bronchitis are caused by viral infections, which means that they cannot be treated with antibiotics. Taking them will not help you get better any faster and can lead to other problems, such as antibiotic resistance. If you have acute bronchitis caused by a bacterial infection, you may need to take prescription antibiotics. The specific antibiotic is determined based on the likely bacterial organism. If you do need to take antibiotics, be sure to take all of your medication as prescribed and do not stop just because you are feeling better.

• Bronchodilators: Bronchodilators such as Proventil (albuterol) relax the muscles around the bronchi, allowing them to become wider. This helps remove bronchial secretions while relieving bronchospasm and reducing airway obstruction. Your wheezing and chest tightness may temporarily improve, and more oxygen can be distributed to your lungs to improve your energy level. Some of these medications are referred to as rescue inhalers because they work quickly and are used to treat sudden episodes of shortness of breath related to bronchospasm.

• P hosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) Inhibitors: PDE4 inhibitors Daliresp (roflumilast) are a class of medication that treats inflammation associated with lung disease. A once-daily oral medication, PDE4 inhibitors help reduce exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, typically with minimal side effects.

• Chest physiotherapy: This procedure, which may also be referred to as chest percussion, is a technique which involves clapping on the chest and/or back to help loosen mucus and make it easier to cough up. It is often used with postural drainage and can be performed using cupped hands or an airway clearance device.

• Airway clearance devices: These devices are used in conjunction with chest therapy and postural drainage to better ensure mucus clearance from the lungs. The devices have been shown to improve results compared to physiotherapy and drainage alone. They are relatively affordable and easy to use, and your therapist or doctor may recommend a device if you have chronic bronchitis.

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