Natural trigger finger remedies pregnancy safe antiemetics

A condition that involves the locking and trigger-like release of one of the fingers, trigger finger can be uncomfortable and even painful. The condition can be treated using a variety of methods including acupuncture, stretches and exercises as well as dietary changes. Likewise, nutritional supplements support the effective functioning of the muscles and ligaments of the body and effectively treat the condition. What is Trigger Finger?

Also known as stenosing tenosynovitis, trigger finger occurs as one of the fingers or thumbs gets stuck in a bent position and straightens with a sudden snap – like a trigger. The cause of the condition is the narrowing of the sheath that surrounds the tendon in the affected finger and is often accompanied by inflammation, scarring and thickening of the tissue in the area.


Natural Remedies for Stenosing Tenosynovitis or Trigger Finger

A variety of treatments are effective for managing trigger finger. Common treatments include acupuncture, physical therapy, daily exercises and others. Nutritional supplements including bromelain, fish oil, aloe vera and others also treat the condition by lubricating the joints and relieving inflammation. Bromelain

An enzyme found in pineapple juice, bromelain has a variety of medicinal purposes. The chemicals in bromelain stimulate the body to produce natural substances that relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Additionally, the compound aids in the removal of dead and damaged tissue, which may help treat the underlying cause of trigger finger. Fish Oil

Aloe vera functions primarily in relieving inflammation associated with trigger finger. Applied to the affected area or taken as a supplement, aloe vera delivers over 12 substances, including B-sisterole, which inhibit inflammation and reduce the stiffness and soreness in painful joints. The compound also contains a variety of other vitamins and minerals that promote overall wellness.

More common in women and in individuals with diabetes, trigger finger varies depending on the severity of the specific case. Nonetheless, the condition is often painful but can be effectively treated using a combination of nutritional supplements and exercises.

Thank you so much for your break down of various magnesiums. You define four of them; the one I take orally is Mag citrate. I have another that is Mag carbonate. Epsom Salts is Mag sulfate. You discuss the last one as a laxative but I use that for Mag/Salts baths too. Is that your understanding? That one is the best to use for baths… Sulfate (Epsom salts) and the Mag Oil (so called) best for topical application is Mag chloride, and you mention chelated Mag Glycinate for oral and say to avoid the one in stores which you say is Mag Oxide.

I’ve thought that Mag in its various forms are basically the same thing; formulated or compounded differently but with the same chemical effect. And the point is if you take or ingest in any way (baths with Sulfate or swallow in citrate) you’re still getting the magnesium.

It’s just that we see in the discussions of Magnesium particular Mags are mentioned and I’m always wondering if they are actually specialty or are they in essence fungible? (I mean interchangable and really the same for all practical purposes.)

I have had my second bout with trigger thumb. The first time I had a cortisone shot which after two weeks resolved the problem. My doctor didn’t seem to think it would work and thought that I would probably have to have surgery to resolve it, but I was also taking MSM which I think helped tremendously. However, this second time around, the MSM has not worked. I really didn’t want another cortisone treatment and have tried both exercises and other herbal treatments without success. Two weeks ago, I got an intestinal virus which I took colloidal silver for and noticed that my thumb was doing better, but I thought that it was finally starting to go away on it’s own until yesterday morning. I woke up in a lot of pain, my thumb was swollen and red and hot to the touch. That’s when I realized that it was an infection of some sort. Since I hadn’t cut my thumb I was pretty sure that the infection was not bacterial, and had a strong suspicion that it was a yeast infection. Which explains why it had reoccured and why some people are having success with garlic as it has antifungul properties.

So I started taking colloidal silver, a tablespoon every few hours, letting it sit under my tongue as long as possible for quicker absorption. I also rubbed horipito extract on the swollen area before going to bed and kept a hotpack on it through the night. This morning, the swelling and redness, and most of the pain had subsided. Through the last two days, I have also rubbed in an arnica cream. By this evening, I was able to bend my thumb without a lot of pain or snapping, and I haven’t been able to do this for the last six weeks. I plan on continuing the same treatment using the horipito and silver in the same amounts for at least the next two to three days. Then I will reduce the amount of colloidal silver to a tablespoon in the morning and one in the evening until I am absolutely sure that the infection is gone. In all honesty, I am absolutely amazed how quickly this is working for me.