President trump signs new action against venezuela signs of concussion in a toddler

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A growing roster of nations on Monday decried Venezuela’s presidential election as a farce, with the U.S. leading the charge in announcing new financial restrictions aimed at further isolating President Nicolas Maduro’s embattled government.

President Donald Trump signed an order restricting the Venezuelan government’s ability to liquidate assets, stopping short of delivering threatened and potentially crippling oil sanctions for the nation atop the world’s largest crude reserves.

The U.S. announcement came after a coalition of 14 nations from throughout the Americas, including heavyweights like Brazil, Mexico and Colombia, pledged to scale back diplomatic relations with Venezuela and urge international organizations not to issue the Venezuelan government any new credit unless it pertains to humanitarian aid.


Meanwhile, the nation’s fragmented opposition vowed to unify and push for a new presidential election in the last trimester of 2018. Leaders said the Venezuelan people had delivered a silent by powerful message by largely abstaining from Sunday’s vote. The election drew the lowest participation on record for a presidential contest in decades.

A social crisis years in the making has worsened as Venezuela’s oil production — the source of almost all of its foreign income — has collapsed to the lowest level in decades and financial sanctions by the Trump administration have made it impossible for the government to renegotiate its debts. More than 1 million people have fled the country in the past two years and 14,000 percent inflation has crushed the minimum wage to less than $2 a month.

Maduro, 55, immediately called for dialogue with his opponents and put the best face on what analysts said were disappointing results underscoring how vulnerable his hold on power remains. Despite energetic campaigning, his overall vote haul slipped by nearly 1 million votes from 2013, when he was first elected after his mentor Hugo Chavez’s death from cancer.

We will be the most powerful and largest political force in Venezuela for a long time, he told a festive crowd of supporters who poured into the grounds of the presidential palace to celebrate. It doesn’t faze me when they say I’m a dictator.

Both of Maduro’s opponents accused electoral authorities of ignoring blatant violations before the vote and on election day, like allowing the Red Points within 656 feet (200 meters) of voting centers. Maduro accused his opponents of trying to demonize a program intended to address the social crisis and not assert political control.

Opinion polls say the overwhelming majority of Venezuelans distrust the electoral council. Official turnout figures in last year’s elections for a constitutional assembly, which the opposition also boycotted, were inflated by at least 1 million votes, according to the company that provided technology for Venezuela’s electronic voting machines for more than a decade.

If you’re sick and the doctor gives you few days to live, you don’t lie in bed waiting to die. You seek treatment, said Nayra Martinez, a city employee in the wealthy Caracas district of Chacao who decided to buck her party’s call to abstain. That’s what we need to do with our country. Venezuela is very sick and we the people are the medicine.

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A growing roster of nations on Monday decried Venezuela’s presidential election as a farce, with the U.S. leading the charge in announcing new financial restrictions aimed at further isolating President Nicolas Maduro’s embattled government.

President Donald Trump signed an order restricting the Venezuelan government’s ability to liquidate assets, stopping short of delivering threatened and potentially crippling oil sanctions for the nation atop the world’s largest crude reserves.

The U.S. announcement came after a coalition of 14 nations from throughout the Americas, including heavyweights like Brazil, Mexico and Colombia, pledged to scale back diplomatic relations with Venezuela and urge international organizations not to issue the Venezuelan government any new credit unless it pertains to humanitarian aid.

Meanwhile, the nation’s fragmented opposition vowed to unify and push for a new presidential election in the last trimester of 2018. Leaders said the Venezuelan people had delivered a silent by powerful message by largely abstaining from Sunday’s vote. The election drew the lowest participation on record for a presidential contest in decades.

A social crisis years in the making has worsened as Venezuela’s oil production — the source of almost all of its foreign income — has collapsed to the lowest level in decades and financial sanctions by the Trump administration have made it impossible for the government to renegotiate its debts. More than 1 million people have fled the country in the past two years and 14,000 percent inflation has crushed the minimum wage to less than $2 a month.

Maduro, 55, immediately called for dialogue with his opponents and put the best face on what analysts said were disappointing results underscoring how vulnerable his hold on power remains. Despite energetic campaigning, his overall vote haul slipped by nearly 1 million votes from 2013, when he was first elected after his mentor Hugo Chavez’s death from cancer.

We will be the most powerful and largest political force in Venezuela for a long time, he told a festive crowd of supporters who poured into the grounds of the presidential palace to celebrate. It doesn’t faze me when they say I’m a dictator.

Both of Maduro’s opponents accused electoral authorities of ignoring blatant violations before the vote and on election day, like allowing the Red Points within 656 feet (200 meters) of voting centers. Maduro accused his opponents of trying to demonize a program intended to address the social crisis and not assert political control.

Opinion polls say the overwhelming majority of Venezuelans distrust the electoral council. Official turnout figures in last year’s elections for a constitutional assembly, which the opposition also boycotted, were inflated by at least 1 million votes, according to the company that provided technology for Venezuela’s electronic voting machines for more than a decade.

If you’re sick and the doctor gives you few days to live, you don’t lie in bed waiting to die. You seek treatment, said Nayra Martinez, a city employee in the wealthy Caracas district of Chacao who decided to buck her party’s call to abstain. That’s what we need to do with our country. Venezuela is very sick and we the people are the medicine.