Prostate cancer grade and stage lifespan blood transfusion for cancer patients

Once your healthcare provider knows you have cancer, the next step is to find out the grade and stage of the cancer. Grade is a way to note how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope. Staging of cancer is a method of noting the extent of the cancer. The stage tells how big the cancer is, and if it has spread. Grade and stage are determined when a biopsy (tissue sample) and other tests are done on the cancer. Staging and grading of cancer is important for deciding how to treat it, and how curable it is. Grades of prostate cancer

In recent years, doctors have realized that the Gleason score might not always be the best way to grade prostate cancer. For example, not all cancers with a Gleason score of 7 are the same. Cancers with more Grade 3 areas (3 + 4 = 7 Gleason score) are less likely to grow and spread than cancers with more Grade 4 areas (4 + 3 = 7 Gleason score).


Likewise, Gleason score 8 cancers are less likely to grow and spread than cancers with a Gleason score of 9 or 10. Because of this, doctors have started to use a newer system, which breaks up prostate cancers into 5 Grade Groups:

Once your healthcare provider has determined your T, N, and M values, he or she then uses them, along with the PSA level and grade group of the cancer, to determine your overall stage grouping. A stage grouping can have a value of 1 to 4. These numbers are written as Roman numerals I, II, II, and IV. A stage grouping can have a value of 1 to 4. These numbers are written as Roman numerals I, II, II, and IV. The lower numbered stages mean cancers that are typically smaller and slower growing. So they tend to be easier to treat and cure. The higher the number, the more advanced the cancer is. Letters and numbers can be used after the Roman numeral to give more details. Prostate cancer stage groupings

The tumor can’t be felt by digital rectal exam (DRE) or seen on an ultrasound. (It was found due to tests or surgery done for another reason.) It has not spread beyond the prostate. The Gleason score is 6 or less. The PSA level is less than 10. (T1, N0, M0)

The tumor can be felt by digital rectal exam (DRE) or seen on an ultrasound. (It was found due to tests or surgery done for another reason.) It’s in in half or less than half of one side of the prostate and has not spread beyond the prostate. Or, the prostate was removed and the cancer was only inside it. The Grade Group is 1. The PSA level is between 10 and 20.

Stage IIIB. The tumor has spread beyond the prostate to the glands that make semen (seminal vesicles). Or, it has spread to nearby tissues such as the bladder’s external sphincter muscle that controls urine flow, the bladder, the rectum, or the wall of the pelvis. It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes. The Grade Group is 1 to 4. The PSA can be any level.

Stage IVB. The tumor may or may not have spread beyond the prostate into nearby tissues. It may or may not have spread to nearby lymph nodes. It has spread to other parts of the body, such as distant lymph nodes, bones, or other organs. It’s any Grade Group. The PSA can be any level.

When your cancer is staged, your healthcare provider will talk with you about what the stage means for your treatment. Ask your healthcare provider to explain the stage of your cancer to you in a way you can understand. Ask any questions or talk about your concerns.