‘Spooky action at a distance’ researchers develop module for quantum repeater – science newsline staphylococcus aureus images

Communication using quantum states offers ultimate security, because eavesdropping attempts perturb the signal and would therefore not remain undetected. For the same reason, though, long-distance transmission of that information is difficult. In classical telecommunication, the increasing attenuation of the signal is counteracted by measuring, amplifying and re-sending it in so-called repeater stations, but this turns out to be as detrimental to the quantum information as an eavesdropper.

The authors refute arguments recently presented in a number of publications, including two reports from the EU and the World Health Organization (WHO). The results of the studies conducted by Reichrath et al. have recently been published in two articles in the scientific journal Anticancer Research (Vol. 38).


A research team led by Professor Julie Bakker at Liège University (Belgium) and Professor Ulrich Boehm at Saarland University (Germany) has made a major advancement in our understanding of how the brain controls sex. Their research results are published today in Nature Communications.

One of the most important tools for solving this complex puzzle is special software developed by scientists at the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University. The renowned journal Nature Communications has reported twice on their research.

The thinnest materials that can be produced today have the thickness of a single atom. These materials – known as two-dimensional materials – exhibit properties that are very different compared with their bulk three-dimensional counterparts. Until recently, 2D materials were produced and manipulated as films on the surface of some suitable 3D substrate. Working in collaboration with a team from the Leibniz Institute for New Materials, a group of physicists at Saarland University, led by Professor Uwe Hartmann, has for the first time

Controlling systems–like the navigation system in a car–by voice is very convenient. However, one must ask the question of how best to design voice controls. Especially when we are handling two tasks simultaneously, cognitive control plays a decisive role, says Vera Demberg, professor of computer science and computational linguistics at Saarland University. Among scientists, cognitive control denotes the ability of a person to adapt information processing and behavior from moment to moment to the respective situation.

Until now, if you were to hang an advertising poster in the pedestrian zone, and wanted to know how many people actually looked at it, you would not have had a chance, explains Andreas Bulling, who leads the independent research group Perceptual User Interfaces at the Excellence Cluster at Saarland University and the Max Planck Institute for Informatics. Previously, one would try to capture this important information by measuring gaze direction. This required special eye tracking equipment which needed minutes-long calibration; what was

All living cells that grow and divide have a constant demand for producing new proteins and new membrane lipids. Some cells of the human body, however, are specialized to secrete tremendous amounts of proteins. Plasma cells, for example, produce antibodies that ward off bacteria and viruses. Another example are cells from the pancreas that manufacture insulin, which is essential for regulating the blood sugar levels. Such cells are known as secretory cells.

Bacteria of the species Staphylococcus aureus are among the most widespread and dangerous pathogens of our time. One of the reasons for their effectiveness is their ability to adhere to both synthetic and natural surfaces, where they form very persistent biofilms. These biofilms effectively protect the individual pathogens making them very difficult to remove from a surface. This is why their presence on medical implants is so feared and why they are a major cause of post-operative infection. One approach to preventing infection